gluten free matzo balls with quinoa flakes

Using Quinoa flakes for gluten free matzo balls

Thanks to the awesome Wendy from Girl’s Gone Child Eat Well blog … matzo balls are back! Of course they are gluten, dairy and soy free. Below is her recipe. Visit her site for more detailed directions.

Wendy’s Gluten-Free Quinoa Matzo Balls (with nutmeg of course!)

2 eggs, beaten
4 T canola or olive oil
(you can cook some very finely chopped onion in the oil until browned to add more flavor if you want to)
¼ cup chicken(less) soup or seltzer water
1 cup quinoa flakes, not packed
½ teaspoon xanthan gum
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon grated nutmeg
pepper to taste

The matzo balls taste fantastic. The texture is similar to a regular matzo ball and with some homemade chicken broth with veggies you are all set.

Matzo balls are about twice the size when they are fully cooked

Matzo balls are about twice the size when they are fully cooked

A few other notes:
1) You ready do need to cook the matzo balls for 30 minutes or maybe a little longer.
2) The matzo balls are about twice the size when they are fully cooked.
3) I added a few more quiona flakes to the mixture because I didn’t have time to put in the refrigerator and it worked just out fine.
4) GI Jane told me that you can use quiona flakes to make a lot of stuff like muffins
5)  Xantham gum is in the recipe so what does it do? Here is the definition from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xanthan_gum After reading the definition I still didn’t really know what it is so I did more google searches and found this explanation the simple wikipedia link http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xanthan_gum

Xanthan gum is a polysaccharide (a complex form of sugar). It is added to certain foods, such as salad dressings, to make them thicker. It is also added to cosmetics to keep the ingredients from separating. To make xanthan gum, workers deliberately add a kind of bacterium, Xanthomonas campestris, to glucose or sucrose. They let the mixture ferment for a while, and then add isopropyl alcohol to separate the polysaccharide from the mixture. They dry the polysaccharide, grind it into a powder, then add it to a liquid. The xanthan gum is then ready to use.

Cooking gluten free matzo balls

Cooking gluten free matzo balls